SOIL Gallery

What we Treasure: Stories from Yesler Terrace

Art Circle: Rachel Brumer, Pat Graney, Devon Midori Hale
Rachel Kessler
George Lee
DK Pan

Start             10.5.17
End               10.28.17
Reception    10.5.17, Thursday, 6-8 pm

Built in 1941 as the nation’s first racially integrated community, Yesler Terrace was the brainchild of visionary Jesse Epstein, the first Executive Director of Seattle Housing Authority and Irene Burns Miller, the relocation supervisor for people living on Profanity Hill.

Yesler Terrace’s historic housing complex is undergoing dramatic transition. Together, Artists-in-Residence and community members created artwork focusing on the gravitational pull of “home.” Working with elders and youth from East Africa, Vietnam, China, Mexico, and the Central District, artists held workshops, hosted celebrations, visited homes, and made artwork with the community.

What We Treasure explores the origins of Yesler Terrace and surrounding communities. The installation incorporates portrait photography, fabric collages, castings, ink portraits, original Yesler Terrace architectural plans, and stories collected from area residents, showing the layered histories that have created and defined the area known as Yesler Terrace.

“Yesler Terrace was a cradle for me. I felt safe there. It’s a place where I learned to believe in myself.”
– former resident Jean Harris, Anthropology Professor

THE ARTIST RESIDENCY PROGRAM WAS FUNDED BY A GRANT TO SEATTLE HOUSING AUTHORITY FROM THE KRESGE FOUNDATION.


Download multilingual PDF about the exhibition (Chinese/Spanish/Amharic/Vietnamese)

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In the Backspace: Forming the Overhand Knot

Tom Albers

Start             10.5.17
End               10.28.17
Reception    10.5.17, Thursday, 6-8pm


Artist Statement:

My art making process combines gestural marks and material handling with a structural, geometric and /or rigid device.

After watching an artist friend of mine tying strips of paper into overhand knots I decided to try it. Not only does this simple knot in rope have a reliable practical use, its flattened presence, as in a paper knot, has a sense of containment and geometry.

I realized that one flat overhand knot forms one of the five corners of a pentagon. Using the knot as a device for my process, I folded and tied my paintings on paper and other rolls of material into pentagons. The art then becomes a dichotomy of a static shape holding active marks.

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Upcoming Exhibitions

Art To Read
Alexandria Vickery, Jessica Hoffman, Martine Workman, Michael Heck, Mita Mahato, Robyn Jordan, Taylor Dow, Yuka Petz
November 2 – December 2, 2017