SOIL Gallery

Intimately Unseen

Start             9.1.16
End               10.1.16
Reception    9.1.16, Thursday, 6-8 pm

Intimately Unseen is an investigation of personal space, growth, and tension by Seattle-based artists Jessica Hoffman, Satpreet Kahlon, and Markel Uriu. This exhibition includes installations, drawings, paintings, and prints that explore the ritual of seeking and creating space. Coming from different cultural backgrounds, all three artists are trying to find a place where they belong, a place where they feel safe, and a place where they can grow.

Hoffman explores narrative, memory, daily rituals, and modes of communication through the use of found objects. Her work for this show uses found footage from surveillance cameras to create a print installation and an interactive piece in which viewers are encouraged to track her whereabouts for the duration of the exhibition. Through these pieces, Hoffman is considering the impermanent nature of communication and how that relates to memory, ephemeral objects, and physical contact. Kahlon uses meditative, repetitive processes to combine rudimentary industrial materials with craft materials in her practice, creating pieces that are narrative, lyrical, and reference tension and duality. For this show, Kahlon created a capsule-like box which contains detritus of past and future works, pieces which, when culminated in one space, act as testaments to self-created systems of survival developed as an attempt to cope with and survive through the inherent trauma of living as a first-generation woman of color in the United States. Uriu’s installation work creates a space for the observation and recording of the growth and death of a garden. Seeds and soil taken from abandon lots in Seattle were nurtured for three months to create an installation exploring home, personal space, patience, and ephemerality. The accompanying drawings, paintings, and prints create a full portrait of the garden at every stage of growth.

    

SOIL receives support from 4Culture and the Seattle Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs