Susanna Bluhm
Your name is perfume poured out; therefore the virgins love you.
2009
Oil on canvas
40 x 40 in.

Chris Buening
Mad Dog
2010
Acrylic, pastels, graphite, colored pencil, spray paint, and correction fluid on cut paper.
48 x 34 in.

Timothy Cross
Fanny McPoodlepants
2010
Gouache on inkjet print
13 x 19 in.

Curtis Erlinger
Duet
2010
Ink on paper, camera, monitor

Cable Griffith
2010
Acrylic on canvas
30 x 40 in.

Derrick Jefferies
Anatomy (Muscle)
Polyethylene and tube lamps
2010
Backlight inkjet print & lightbox

Kirk Lang
Wait (detail)
2010
Electronics, paint, pillows
Dimensions variable

Philip Miner
Untitled
2010
Oil on pre-primed canvas
20 x 16 in.

Timea Tihanyi
House of Reason (detail)
2010
Toothpicks, plaster, insulation foam, felt, nylon straps
67 x 16 x 16 in.

Joey Veltkamp
Sacrifice (father & son)
2009
Acrylic on canvas
20 x 20 in.

July 2010

New Members Show
Susanna Bluhm, Chris Buening, Timothy Cross, Curtis Erlinger, Cable Griffith, Derrick Jefferies, Kirk Lang, Philip Miner, Timea Tihanyi, Joey Veltkamp

June 30 – July 31, 2010

Opening reception Thursday, July 1, 2010, 6–8pm

SOIL is pleased to welcome TEN new members! The gallery will burst at the seams in July, with new work by Susanna Bluhm, Chris Buening, Timothy Cross, Curtis Erlinger, Cable Griffith, Derrick Jefferies, Kirk Lang, Philip Miner, Timea Tihanyi, Joey Veltkamp.

Christopher Buening’s abstract paintings are conceived as portraits of experiences, with layers of personal symbols that represent sexual, spiritual and pharmacological transformation and re-birth. Timea Tihanyi’s plaster and wood house of cards is kept safe by being strapped down between layers of pink foam. Kirk Lang investigates the relationship between measured and perceived time within the context of his own personal experiences. Joey Veltkamp's paintings are offered as a gesture towards reconciling the schism that exists between father and son. Working from the Bible’s Song of Solomon, Susanna Bluhm is painting a love song to her wife and son, in the form of verdant landscapes. Tim Cross follows his nose “to connect to a narrative that is bigger than myself, and closer to what is true and real.” Curtis Erlinger “privately adopts and indirectly endures” the consequences of his parents’ meaningful moments as he works from their dusty archive of snapshots and photographic negatives. Photographing such subjects as fruit skins, chewed gum and latex barriers, Derrick Jefferies transforms the banal into an abstract narrative of biology and sex. Cable Griffith’s work is about searching for a place that does not exist, but finding it, while attempting to unify two separate realities. Philip Miner is exploring painting as a field of variables—materials, support, ground, surface, paint—which can be manipulated to produce an image.

 


June at SOIL in the Backspace:
Jeff McGrath: Bahogkins